Jason Hope Is One Important Innovator To Watch

Ever since Jason Hope was a child, he had an insatiable fixation on technology and the transformational role it played in people’s lives. Growing up, he voraciously read such publications as Popular Science, Nature and even technical journals for engineers and computer scientists. It was with this foundation in and acute enchantment with the turning gears of science that he went about setting his own wheels of innovation to turning.

A history of foresight
After graduating from Arizona State University, Mr. Hope founded his first startup, a mobile content provider called Jawa. Jawa provided ringtones, music and videos to cell phone users on a proprietary interface that made downloading and payment as simple as a few clicks. This would all sound largely unremarkable until we consider that Mr. Hope was doing all this in the late 90s, 10 years before the first iPhone hit the shelves and long before the majority of people even had cell phones.

Mr. Hope’s crystal ball, which allowed him to apparently see trends decades before they manifested, has not failed him since either. He’s founded various firms including a highly successful search engine optimization company that has helped thousands of clients rank their websites on the first page of Google as well as a number of B2B mobile applications and industrial software solutions.

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Despite all these successes, Mr. Hope sees them as being absolutely nothing compared to what’s coming. Currently, he’s preaching the gospel to a flock of techies and internet-savvy entrepreneurs through his guest blogging and writing efforts on a number of sites from Wired to his own blog, JasonHope.com. Hope is proselytizing audiences to the technological rapture that he sees in the coming widespread adoption of the Internet of Things. Hope says that this new networking paradigm, more than just a logical extension of existing infrastructure, will represent a transformation as profound as the Industrial Revolution.

Hope states that the Internet of Things will usher in efficiency gains and reduction of labor demand that will be totally unprecedented in human history. He is profoundly optimistic that this will lead to such things as the 15 hour work week, once dismissed as Utopian fantasy.